Diminutive Qualia

"It is not the healthy who need a doctor, but the sick. I have not come to call the righteous, but sinners."

Mark 2:17
agentrodgers:

risinyira:

stele3:

wimpytav:

kittykatparadox:

brs-official:

laughing-llama:

genufa:


sigur-roskolnikov:


This tree makes の sense.


*spits coffee*



Are you fucking kidding me.

#For the people who don’t know:#The character ‘の’ is pronounced as ‘no’#Also the tree is shaped like の#’This tree makes no sense.’#You’re welcome.

tHANK YOU, sCIENCE SIDE,

Actually that’s the language side—Japanese language, to be exact. We’re still waiting to hear from the science side of Tumblr as to how and why a tree would grow in this manner.

Trees grow in the direction of light, so clearly this tree had light in a strange loopy pattern during growth.
Plant follow light, light make loopy loop, plant go loopy loop.

thanks, science side

agentrodgers:

risinyira:

stele3:

wimpytav:

kittykatparadox:

brs-official:

laughing-llama:

genufa:

sigur-roskolnikov:

This tree makes の sense.

*spits coffee*

Are you fucking kidding me.

tHANK YOU, sCIENCE SIDE,

Actually that’s the language side—Japanese language, to be exact. We’re still waiting to hear from the science side of Tumblr as to how and why a tree would grow in this manner.

Trees grow in the direction of light, so clearly this tree had light in a strange loopy pattern during growth.

Plant follow light, light make loopy loop, plant go loopy loop.

thanks, science side

(Source: meme4u, via sommesbelles-deactivated2014090)

More than 10,000 people are feared dead after Typhoon Haiyan made landfall Friday in the central Philippines, local officials said. So far, the official death toll is 2,344, but the number is expected to rise as aid organizations mobilize to deliver food, water and medicine to survivors.
Here are some ways you can help the recovery efforts:
World Food Programme, the United Nations organization, allocated $2 million for the response to the disaster and sent 40 metric tons of fortified biscuits for preliminary food relief. Donations can be made online. You can also text the word AID to 27722 to donate $10.
The American Red Cross has activated a tracing service to help locate missing people and says to contact your local chapter to initiate a case if you’re unable to reach missing family members. To help support the organization’s disaster relief efforts, you can donate online.
The Philippine Red Cross also has several ways to donate to assist their localized efforts, including a tracking service as well.

Additional number for Restoring Family Links/Tracing: 09179519711, 09154940415 #tracingPH
— Philippine Red Cross (@philredcross)
November 11, 2013

AmeriCares launched the Philippines Disaster Relief Fund to help send medical aid, including antibiotics, wound care supplies and pain relievers to survivors.
Oxfam has deployed emergency responders to the area to assist with disaster relief. Donations can be made to Oxfam’s Typhoon Haiyan Relief and Recovery Fund online.
Save the Children relief kits for children and families are being distributed through the Philippines Annual Monsoon and Typhoon Children in Emergency Fund. Donations can be made online.

Text DONATE to 20222 to donate $10 to support our work to help kids affected by Typhoon #Haiyan/#Yolanda. Standard rates apply. Please RT
— Save the Children (@SavetheChildren)
November 11, 2013

Salvation Army says that 100 percent of donations will support disaster relief efforts. The Salvation Army is accepting donations online and or you can text TYPHOON to 80888 to donate $10.
Estimating that up to 1.7 million children will be affected by the super typhoon, UNICEF, the UN Children’s Fund, is providing water purification tablets, medical kits, nutrition supplies and other emergency supplies to children and families in the area. You can donate online or call 1-800-367-5437 to donate by phone.
ShelterBox provides displaced families with survival kits that include temporary shelters and other supplies. Donations can be made online.
Heifer International says its 4,000 project participants in the Philippines suffered a huge loss of property, including houses and livestock. The hunger relief organization is providing food, water and roofing materials for basic shelters. You can donate online.
In the Philippines, Gawad Kalinga is distributing food packs containing a combination of rice, canned goods and water. Each pack costs 200 Philippine pesos, or about $4.60. You can donate on their website and read more about the organization, whose name means “give care” in Filipino.
More resources: Trying to contact loved ones in the Philippines? Here are a few ways to start your search
Read More: In typhoon-ravaged Tacloban, ‘no place to bury the dead’
Follow @NewsHourWorld
// 
Information about ways to donate from:http://www.pbs.org/newshour/rundown/2013/11/how-to-help-the-typhoon-relief-efforts.html
Image by me with quotes taken from:http://www.theguardian.com/world/2013/nov/13/typhoon-haiyan-survivors-struggle-shattered-worldhttp://mashable.com/2013/11/13/facebook-haiyan-survivor/http://www.npr.org/2013/11/13/245057678/typhoon-victims-struggle-to-survive-as-aid-is-slow-to-arrivehttp://www.nydailynews.com/news/world/typhoon-haiyan-kills-1-200-philippines-report-article-1.1511577#ixzz2kgmpdw00http://www.cnn.com/2013/11/12/world/asia/typhoon-haiyan-vignettes/http://www.cnn.com/2013/11/14/world/asia/typhoon-haiyan/index.html?hpt=wo_c1

More than 10,000 people are feared dead after Typhoon Haiyan made landfall Friday in the central Philippines, local officials said. So far, the official death toll is 2,344, but the number is expected to rise as aid organizations mobilize to deliver food, water and medicine to survivors.

Here are some ways you can help the recovery efforts:

World Food Programme, the United Nations organization, allocated $2 million for the response to the disaster and sent 40 metric tons of fortified biscuits for preliminary food relief. Donations can be made online. You can also text the word AID to 27722 to donate $10.

The American Red Cross has activated a tracing service to help locate missing people and says to contact your local chapter to initiate a case if you’re unable to reach missing family members. To help support the organization’s disaster relief efforts, you can donate online.

The Philippine Red Cross also has several ways to donate to assist their localized efforts, including a tracking service as well.

AmeriCares launched the Philippines Disaster Relief Fund to help send medical aid, including antibiotics, wound care supplies and pain relievers to survivors.

Oxfam has deployed emergency responders to the area to assist with disaster relief. Donations can be made to Oxfam’s Typhoon Haiyan Relief and Recovery Fund online.

Save the Children relief kits for children and families are being distributed through the Philippines Annual Monsoon and Typhoon Children in Emergency Fund. Donations can be made online.

Salvation Army says that 100 percent of donations will support disaster relief efforts. The Salvation Army is accepting donations online and or you can text TYPHOON to 80888 to donate $10.

Estimating that up to 1.7 million children will be affected by the super typhoon, UNICEF, the UN Children’s Fund, is providing water purification tablets, medical kits, nutrition supplies and other emergency supplies to children and families in the area. You can donate online or call 1-800-367-5437 to donate by phone.

ShelterBox provides displaced families with survival kits that include temporary shelters and other supplies. Donations can be made online.

Heifer International says its 4,000 project participants in the Philippines suffered a huge loss of property, including houses and livestock. The hunger relief organization is providing food, water and roofing materials for basic shelters. You can donate online.

In the Philippines, Gawad Kalinga is distributing food packs containing a combination of rice, canned goods and water. Each pack costs 200 Philippine pesos, or about $4.60. You can donate on their website and read more about the organization, whose name means “give care” in Filipino.


More resources: Trying to contact loved ones in the Philippines? Here are a few ways to start your search

Read More: In typhoon-ravaged Tacloban, ‘no place to bury the dead’

Information about ways to donate from:
http://www.pbs.org/newshour/rundown/2013/11/how-to-help-the-typhoon-relief-efforts.html

Image by me with quotes taken from:
http://www.theguardian.com/world/2013/nov/13/typhoon-haiyan-survivors-struggle-shattered-world
http://mashable.com/2013/11/13/facebook-haiyan-survivor/
http://www.npr.org/2013/11/13/245057678/typhoon-victims-struggle-to-survive-as-aid-is-slow-to-arrive
http://www.nydailynews.com/news/world/typhoon-haiyan-kills-1-200-philippines-report-article-1.1511577#ixzz2kgmpdw00
http://www.cnn.com/2013/11/12/world/asia/typhoon-haiyan-vignettes/
http://www.cnn.com/2013/11/14/world/asia/typhoon-haiyan/index.html?hpt=wo_c1

Anonymous asked: The raw numbers (12th Nov 2013) make Haiyan's damages look small relative to Katrina and Sandy, but relative to the nation's economy, they are larger. As a percentage of the national economy (GDP), the damages are: Katrina 0.7%, Sandy 0.4%, Haiyan 5%. As a multiple of the GDP per capita (how many people have to labor for a year to compensate): Katrina 2 mil., Sandy 1 M, Haiyan 6 M. -- Dale worley // alum mit edu

That’s a really great analysis. I’ll add it to the post. I was also concerned that people would belittle the damage done in the Philippines because the dollar amount was small but I couldn’t think of an intelligent way of explaining it relatively. Thanks :)